David Smock was arrested in Harrison, Ark. after he spent several days on the run from police. He was booked into the Boone County Jail on Tuesday and will face a Greene County court Wednesday morning. The Stockton, Mo. man is facing sex crimes charges against children.

Those charges include three felony child sex crime charges and eight felony charges recently filed by the Missouri Attorney General’s office. In all, the 11 charges against David Smock include four counts of statutory sodomy, one count of second-degree statutory sodomy, sexual misconduct involving a child under 15, one count of fourth-degree child molestation, one count of third-degree child molestation with someone less than 14, one count of first-degree stalking, and one count of enticement of a child under the age of 15.

The police investigation into David Smock started in the summer of 2018, but some reports against him go back as far as 1996. Most of the incidents that he has been charged with involve his time as a physician at the Agape Boarding School in Stockton.

David Smock was arrested on Tuesday after being on the run from police. He is being charged with 11 sex crimes against children. (Credit: Boone County Sheriff's Office)
David Smock was arrested on Tuesday after being on the run from police. He is being charged with 11 sex crimes against children. (Credit: Boone County Sheriff’s Office)

Police first became aware of Smock’s crimes when one of his victims from the Agape Boarding School came forward. According to the child, Smock had groomed him before he first assaulted the boy. He bought the boy gifts, took his family on trips and allowed the boy to stay with him in his mansion in Jerico Springs.

According to The Kansas City Star, the boarding school doctor had sex crimes reports against him before he found employment at Agape Boarding School. It is unclear if any charges were filed, but since 1996 some people have reported that Smock showed similar grooming attention to young boys, including buying them presents, offering to give them physicals and allowing them to stay and sleep in the same bed as him.

One report says that Smock forced a young child to remove their pants and allow the 47-year-old to touch and hold their penis.

The Missouri Attorney General released a statement after Smock was arrested and said, “Protecting the citizens of our state, especially our children, is of paramount importance to me as Missouri’s Attorney General,” said Missouri Attorney General Schmitt. “The details of the alleged crimes, in this case, are shocking and horrific, and I look forward to working with the Special Prosecutor for Cedar County to obtain justice in this case.”

It is unclear how many children were assaulted by David Smock during his time as school doctor, but according to some students, they were not surprised at the charges.

Former student Cody Shrag said, “I have always got weird vibes off the man. Just from what I’ve seen, and, you know his personality and stuff. It really didn’t surprise me just what we always kind of wondered.”

David Smock was arrested and charged with 11 sex crimes against children. (Credit: Facebook)
David Smock was arrested and charged with 11 sex crimes against children. (Credit: Facebook)

David Smock was not the only educator at Agape Boarding School to be charged with sex crimes against children. In Sept 2021, Cedar County Prosecuting Attorney Ty Gaither charged five teachers at the Christian boarding school with 13 low class felony assault charges.

The charges made many people angry because, according to former students and Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, the prosecutor failed to charge numerous other teachers for similar crimes.

According to a letter sent to the state’s governor by the attorney general on Sept. 23, Schmitt believed that 22 individuals at Agape Boarding School needed to be charged with over 65 charges. Some of those charges would have resulted in a possible sentence of up to 15 years in prison if found guilty.

Gaither said that he refused to charge all 22 individuals with the 65 charges like Schmitt wanted because some of the charges “involved the issue of restraint and discipline and whether parents or guardians have the right to discipline their children. There is a difference of opinion, obviously, between our office and the attorney general, and what I filed were charges that did not involve a discipline question but involved what we thought were assault cases.”

Many former students were angry at Gaither’s decision and said that the charges filed were a big “slap in the face” for the years of abuse that they experienced during their time at the boarding school.