Jess Fox may have won a bronze medal in the Women’s K-1 Slalom, but she wins a “gold” for a hilarious Olympic moment! Before the event, Fox used a condom to repair her kayak and the Internet is going wild over her DIY hack.

Posting on her Instagram story, the Australian Olympian showed fans how she stretched a condom over the tip of her kayak to keep the carbon mixture in place. The latex gave the carbon a smooth finish which helped it perform better in the water.

Jess Fox posted on her Instagram story a video of her using a condom to fix her kayak.
Jess Fox posted on her Instagram story a video of her using a condom to fix her kayak. Photo Credit: Instagram

During the K-1 kayaking event, Fox started out strong. Some even believed that she would win a gold medal. But during the competition, she ran into a gate, which gave her a four-second time penalty. This allowed her competitors to get the edge in the event and beat Fox for the gold.

The Olympian previously won a bronze medal at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro and a silver medal during her time at the London Olympics in 2012.

She made up for her blunder in the next event. During the Women’s C-1 Canoe Slalom she finished first and received a gold medal. She was able to finish the Kasai Canoe Slalom Centre course in an impressive 105.04 seconds.

The Women’s Canoe Slalom is one of 18 new events at this year’s Olympic Games. Some other new sports include skateboarding, karate, and surfing. This event helps to push for more gender equality during the games. It replaced the men’s double canoe slalom. This makes Jess Fox the first women’s champion of the Canoe Slalom.

Jess Fox, the kayaking Olympian from Australia, won a bronze medal at the Tokyo Olympics by using a condom to fix her kayak.
Jess Fox, the kayaking Olympian from Australia, won a bronze medal at the Tokyo Olympics by using birth control to fix her kayak. Photo Credit: Instagram

The gold medal is fitting for Fox, who is known as kayaking royalty in professional circles. Both her mother and father are slalom world champions. Her father has won 10 world titles, and her mother even won a bronze medal at the French Olympics. Fox is coached by her mother and has been winning kayaking competitions since she was a teenager.

The condom that Fox used was issued by the International Olympic Committee. It’s one of thousands given out to Olympians every year. The tradition started during the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games. During the games, athletes were encouraged to practice safe sex. The movement helped bring awareness to the dangers of HIV and AIDS.

Nearly 450,000 condoms were given out at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. This year, because of the pandemic, Olympic rules about condoms have changed. They are still given out, but only after the Olympians have competed in the games. They are discouraged from using condoms during competing weeks and advised to “avoid any unnecessary forms of contact.” This includes hugs, high fives, and sex.

By fixing her kayak, Jess Fox technically broke that rule, but we’ll let it slip because it made for a pretty amazing Olympic moment!